Earthquake Information
December 30, 2010 - M3.8 Indiana Earthquake Print E-mail

M3.8 Earthquake 7:55AM EST Thursday December 30, 2010, in Central Indiana
A small earthquake shook parts of Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Ohio at 7:55 a.m. on December 30, 2010.  No reports of damage have been issued thus far.  The earthquake, located about fifty miles north of Indianapolis, Indiana was originally reported to be a 4.2 magnitude, but was later downgraded to a 3.8 magnitude by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). According to the USGS, the earthquake has been felt by as many as 6200 people in several states.

This earthquake serves as a reminder of the earthquake risk that exists throughout Indiana.  While the greatest risk for a major earthquake is related to the New Madrid and Wabash Valley seismic zones in Indiana, very few earthquakes are known to have occurred in central Indiana in recent history.  The area is not usually seismically active.

February 10, 2010 Earthquake
Read more...
 
April 18, 2008 - M5.2 Mt. Carmel, Indiana Earthquake Print E-mail

April 18, 2008
Mt. Carmel, Illinois

At approximately 4:37AM local time on Friday, April, 18, 2008 a magnitude 5.2 earthquake struck near Mt. Carmel, Illinois.  The epicenter is located in the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone. 

This earthquake was felt in over 16 states by more than 25,000 people according to the US Geological Survey.  The quake caused minor damage in Illinois, Indiana, and Missouri.  There were no reports of casualties or fatalities from the earthquake. 

If you would like to submit damage information, photos, or get more information on this earthquake, please contact us with your request.

April 18, 2008 Earthquake

Magnitude 5.2
Date & Time Friday, April 18, 2008 at 04:37:00 AM at epicenter
Epicenter

38.450°N, 87.890°W
5 Miles NNE of Bellmont, IL

Did You Feel It? If you felt the earthquake, click here to share your experience...
Links

US Geological Survey

Illinois Geological Survey

Maps

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/eqinthenews/2008/us2008qza6/#maps

Posters http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/eqarchives/poster/2008/20080418.php
News Reports and Other Links

Scientists Say Midwest Quakes Poorly Understood - San Francisco Chronicle

YouTube Video of Live Newscast during Earthquake - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQ-AWw4lntk

Wikipedia:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008_Illinois_earthquake

Damage Photos

Photo links from Illinois Geological Survey
      Mt. Carmel, Illinois
      Belmont, Illinois
      Bone Gap, Illinois
      West Salem, Illinois

Updated July 2009

 
February 10, 2010 - M3.8 Illinois Earthquake Print E-mail

M3.8 Earthquake 4am CST Wednesday Feb. 10, 2010, in Northern Illinois
A small earthquake shook parts of northern Illinois at 3:59 a.m on February 10, 2010. The earthquake caused only minor, if any, damage. The earthquake, located about five miles east of Sycamore in DeKalb County, was originally reported to be a 4.3 magnitude, but was later downgraded to a 3.8 magnitude by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). According to the USGS, the The earthquake was felt by as many as 18,000 people in several states and in Canada.

This earthquake serves as a reminder of the earthquake risk that exists throughout Illinois. While the greatest risk for a major earthquake is related to the New Madrid and Wabash Valley seismic zones in southern Illinois, several earthquakes have been reported in the past two centuries in northern Illinois. 

February 10, 2010 Earthquake

Magnitude 3.8M
Date & Time Wednesday, February 10, 2010 at 03:59:35 AM at epicenter
Epicenter

41.969°N, 88.498°W
3 km (2 miles) ENE (60°) from Virgil, IL

Did You Feel It?

If you felt the earthquake, click here to share your experience...

Links

US Geological Survey

Maps

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2010/us2010snay/#maps

News Reports and Other Links

Associated Press

CNN Earthquake-related Tweets

NYTimes

Updated February 2010

 
Recent Central U.S. Earthquakes Print E-mail

In the central United States, earthquakes do occur on a regular basis.  The Center for Earthquake Research and Information in Memphis, Tennessee houses current seismic maps and information that give a comprehensive view into recent seismic activity in this region.  Additionally, the U.S. Geological Survey hosts sites that display United States and Worldwide seismic activity. 

Click here to view Recent Earthquake Activity
 
New Madrid Seismic Zone Print E-mail

In 1811, the central Mississippi Valley was sparsely populated. Today, the region is home to millions of people, including those in the cities of St. Louis, Missouri, and Memphis, Tennessee.  Adding to the danger, most structures in the region were not built to withstand earthquake shaking, as they have been in more seismically active areas like California.  Moreover, most earthquake preparations also have lagged far behind.

Recognizing these problems,  CUSEC, our Member States, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other organizations are joining together to take actions that will greatly reduce loss of life and property in future temblors.

Click here to read more about the New Madrid Seismic Zone
 
Wabash Valley Seismic Zone Print E-mail

Recent studies have indicated that the New Madrid Seismic Zone is not the only 'hot spot' for earthquakes in the Central United States.  On April 18, 2008, a 5.4 magnitude earthquake struck near Mt. Carmel, Illinois, further demonstrating that earthquakes are topic that needs to be addressed.  This earthquake was felt in at least 28 states, by more than 40,000 people, according to the USGS.  Fortunately, there were no serious injuries or fatalities, but non-structural damage was reported in the states of Illinois, Indiana, & Kentucky.

The Wabash Valley Seismic Zone is located in Southeastern Illinois and Southwestern Indiana and it is capable of producing 'New Madrid' size earthquake events. Since the discovery of this seismic zone, earthquake awareness and preparedness have increased.  Residents are seeing that moderate sized earthquakes are not just occurring to the south, but occur right at home and can affect Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky.

Click here to read more about the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone
 
Earthquake FAQs Print E-mail

We have tried to put together some frequently asked questions about the seismic hazard in the central United States.   The FAQ's cover a  range of both technical and non-technical areas.   If you have questions not answered below, please submit them to us.  We will answer them directly to you and will make them available to others via this FAQ.

Click here to view the Earthquake FAQ
 
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